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When F*cked is Funny: Humor as a Shift Move

Erica Schreiber
/
July 11, 2017

I’m going to share one of my favorite resources in my arsenal to shift from below to above the line. It involves laughing (at myself and at life), which is potent medicine when I’m stuck believing my thoughts.

I am one of the most sincerely idealistic people I know. I deeply care about spreading conscious leadership because I’ve experienced how it reduces suffering. Less suffering opens the possibility for a more just and sustainable—and awake—world. I can get caught up in the seriousness of it all. Yet seriousness can be seriously at odds with coming back to presence/consciousness when I—or my clients—drift.

More just, sustainable, and awake doesn’t happen from below the line. One of the easiest—and most fun—ways to come back to presence is through humor. Especially when we’re willing to make fun of the very thing that we’re stuck on.

I watch the video below when I’m stuck below the line believing:

  • Something is serious
  • I’m right
  • There’s a problem
  • The source of my situation is outside of me (person/people and/or circumstance) 

By poking fun at responsibility and blame, my very human tendencies are laid bare, and I can be kinder to myself—and others—for being below the line. Once I’m in a space of kindness, acceptance, and laughter, nine times out of ten, I’ve already shifted back to presence before I’ve even noticed that I have.  

Without further ado, here’s the video. See if it works for you. If not, you can blame it on me for f*cking up.

**Warning: I shared this with a client a while back. Not knowing what it was, she opened the link and played it through her car speakers with the top down at car line at her daughter’s school. If you play the video in a public place with kids around you might want to keep the windows and top up, or with a headset on if you’re at work. Or not. But consider yourself warned.

 
About the Author
Erica Schreiber

Erica works with select elite forward-thinking leaders to illuminate and articulate identity and purpose—including zone of genius—in service of maximizing impact. Her clients range across generation, industry, and perspective. She holds a B.A. in cultural anthropology from Swarthmore College. Erica lives in Santa Barbara with her son.